Oh Boo Fucking Hoo

I just read a “review” of GNOBSD over at a certain website. It was less a review than a timeline of the guy creating a live Gnome-based live DVD using OpenBSD 4.6 and how some in the OpenBSD community reacted when he advertised it in their mailing lists. He withdrew his ISO due to server traffic and less than positive feedback from the community.

He’s not the first to fork from or base something on OpenBSD. He won’t be the last. He’s also not the first person to receive a rebuke of some form from those in the OpenBSD development (and user) community.

I looked through the thread. I didn’t think any of the comments in the thread were incendiary. Some had smilies. Some directed the poster to another thread from last year about a similar issue. I’ve seen much harsher treatment where it’s more deserving. This was all fair and even-handed.

I also think the reaction of the OpenBSD development community might have been a bit different if this GNOBSD guy had first become involved within their community rather than working outside their ecosystem and then advertising a derivative out of the blue in their email lists. Dittos for the guy in the other thread for his “remix” last year. For starters, it would’ve given him an understanding of the community his work is potentially disrupting.

Yes, disrupting. I don’t buy the argument that separate, forked projects like this are of benefit to the upstream project. OpenBSD development is funded by sale of their release CD sets. People downloading an ISO are unlikely to go to the upstream project and support it (just like all the software, music, and movie pirates have a disincentive to go buy more software, music, and movies despite all the fucktards who think they’re acting in the interest of artists when they take it upon themselves to violate copyrights); unfortunately, they are likely to go to the upstream project and ask inane rudimentary questions the developer teams have already answered in their documentation — from their own guides to their man pages. Dumbing the process down brings in dummies. That’s not beneficial to their project.

(Yes, dummies. What’s the fucking purpose of installing something like OpenBSD with a graphical desktop preconfigured if you can do that already with Linux or something else? If you’re unwilling to understand what you’re doing and unwilling to configure it to work exactly the way you want, then you’re looking at the wrong operating system. Stick to your Ubuntu, stick to something that you don’t have to or want to comprehend. Gnome and KDE aren’t Linux or BSD, they’re Gnome and KDE. Most apps can be compiled to run in Windows, so your “friends and family” don’t even have to switch operating systems to see, try, or use them.)

So this is a lose-lose proposition for OpenBSD developers. If they wanted to expand their market share, they already know what they could do — and they’re not doing it. OpenBSD developers are talented enough to assemble such a project if they wanted to. The fact that they haven’t should demonstrate that they’re really not interested in a market-share or dick-measuring contest with other BSDs or with Linux. Accept it.

And to the whiners and bitchers (10, 19, 22, etc.) over at Distrowatch who say they’ll either stop using OpenBSD or never try it over this episode, good riddance. You’re probably not the kind of users Theo&Co would want anyway. Grow a pair.

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