Archive for the ‘hardware’ Category

Various Thoughts and New Stuff – 20090729

July 29, 2009

I’ve found a couple new things that interest me over the past few days.

Acer Timeline

I saw this thin-looking laptop the other day that caught my eye because of the display for it. The display touted how thin it was (about an inch thick) and how long the battery life was (eight hours). I wanted to lift the laptop to see how heavy it was but these displays have tethers and bars to limit movement — or theft. I could get it only so far off the table but it felt pretty light, especially compared to my past full-sized laptops.

The Acer Timeline has a few models, with screens from 13″ to 15.6″ and Intel’s ultra low voltage Core2 Solo processors. The model I saw was the 15.6″ and also was spec’d with a DVD-RW, 3GB of RAM (expandable to 8GB, which requires 64 bit OS), and a 320GB hard drive; resolution on all models appears to be 1366×768. The display model I saw had clear and crisp graphics. These laptops also come with multicard readers. I didn’t see anything indicating onboard Bluetooth. The wifi card is Intel 5100 (abgN); I’m looking at upgrading my home network — and AA1 when its warranty expires — to 802.11-N, so this wouldn’t require any further upgrade when I make the switch. It also had a centered (as far as I can tell anyway; I’m on pain medications) touchpad and a full-sized keyboard. I initially hated the chiclet keyboard on my AA1, and the Timeline’s keyboard is quite similar. I still don’t care for the chiclet keyboard but it wouldn’t be a deal-breaker for me.

Here’s the deal about the battery life. You can only expect eight-or-so hours if you’re not running Aero (these models come with Vista Home Premium) and you’re running some kind of Acer power management utility. This power management utility seems to be CPU scaling and similar things to reduce power consumption. Fair trade off, but I honestly haven’t seen any staggering gain in battery life with CPU scaling on my AA1 — I get about two hours per charge regardless of using XP or Linux. YMMV, but mine hasn’t yet (and I run the most miserly applications I can get away with).

The Timeline caught my eye because it seems to be quite light (just over 5 pounds for the 15.6″ model) and because of the possibility of getting four-times the battery life I’m getting now. I wanted the AA1 because it was lighter and more portable than my aged ThinkPad, not to mention the fact that the AA1 completely outspecs the old ThinkPad. Short of battery life and small screen and small keyboard, the AA1 is suiting my needs quite well. But I do miss having a larger screen and I’d like to get used to using a full-sized keyboard again.

At about $600, the Timeline offers a lot more power and battery life than my AA1. I haven’t decided if or when I’m getting a new laptop or if I’ll keep using the AA1, but the Timeline will probably be on my wishlist. It’s not quite in the class of the Lenovo X300 or Macbook Air, but its price is about a third to a quarter of those models and its extra heft is at least in part due to having an optical drive. I could live with that kind of compromise whether I get five or six hours of battery life or the full advertised eight.

Sabayon CoreCD 4.2

First, I’m not crazy about the name “CoreCD” since it’s too similar to another project’s name. I don’t know if Robert Shingledecker trademarked the “Core” name or even “Tiny Core” but I don’t like it when others copy names of existing projects. Boo!

Second, I was unclear after reading the press release what differentiated CoreCD from Gentoo Stage 3. I found the following on Planet Sabayon in a 23 June entry:

It is designed to “sabayon-infy” a gentoo stage 3 by providing an simple text based installer and up to date packages, as well as a solid core upon which you can build with either entropy or portage.

Ahh, so it’s just Stage 3 done Sabayon style.

In the back of my mind I’ve been fighting an impulse to install a source-based distro like Lunar or Gentoo, or even building from scratch. Sabayon has been pretty easy to dismiss because, until now, the images have been big honking DVD ISOs — which I find, for some reason, quite ridiculous for a source-based distro to offer.

Now I have to add this particular release from Sabayon to the list of the things to quash in the darker recesses of my mind. Especially since I’ve already downloaded it.

One thing is certainly offputting enough to keep me from impulsively installing it: the hideous Red Curtains of Hell splash on the visual tour page on the Sabayon Wiki. I fucking hate splash as it is, but this thing looks like something from “Interior Decorating with Satan.”

Fortunately, that’s something that can be disabled and configured out of a system.

I wonder if I’ll end up installing this before I get a new laptop.

More Linux ath5k WiFi Issues

July 23, 2009

This is the first time it’s happened since I last wrote about it, and second time using kernel 2.6.30.1. So whatever was done to “fix” it apparently didn’t “fix” it. It came today with a little over five hours uptime.

I remembered to run the aliases I set up to grep dmesg (for wlan and ath5k). Here’s the log to which I piped it:

Linux 2.6.30... #1 SMP PREEMPT Tue Jul 14 17:06:14 CDT 2009 i686

[    9.093941] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: PCI INT A -> GSI 18 (level, low) -> IRQ 18
[    9.093987] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: setting latency timer to 64
[    9.094083] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: registered as 'phy0'
[    9.289278] Registered led device: ath5k-phy0::rx
[    9.289347] Registered led device: ath5k-phy0::tx
[    9.289358] ath5k phy0: Atheros AR2425 chip found (MAC: 0xe2, PHY: 0x70)
[  483.323509] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: PCI INT A disabled
[  483.639325] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0xf (was 0x100, writing 0x10b)
[  483.639394] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0x4 (was 0x4, writing 0x55200004)
[  483.639421] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0x3 (was 0x0, writing 0x10)
[  483.639452] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0x1 (was 0x100000, writing 0x100007)
[  483.957988] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: PCI INT A -> GSI 18 (level, low) -> IRQ 18
[  755.057533] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: PCI INT A disabled
[  755.375054] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0xf (was 0x100, writing 0x10b)
[  755.375123] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0x4 (was 0x4, writing 0x55200004)
[  755.375150] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0x3 (was 0x0, writing 0x10)
[  755.375181] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0x1 (was 0x100000, writing 0x100007)
[  755.693656] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: PCI INT A -> GSI 18 (level, low) -> IRQ 18
[12647.090547] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: PCI INT A disabled
[12647.403995] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0xf (was 0x100, writing 0x10b)
[12647.404087] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0x4 (was 0x4, writing 0x55200004)
[12647.404114] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0x3 (was 0x0, writing 0x10)
[12647.404146] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0x1 (was 0x100000, writing 0x100007)
[12647.722396] ath5k 0000:03:00.0: PCI INT A -> GSI 18 (level, low) -> IRQ 18
[18232.330789] ath5k phy0: noise floor calibration timeout (2412MHz)
[18235.589572] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18235.589592] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18235.629885] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18235.629906] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18235.668377] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18235.668398] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18235.706793] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18235.706812] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18235.745242] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18241.071474] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18241.071491] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18241.109901] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18241.109920] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18241.148311] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18241.148330] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18241.186709] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18241.186728] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18241.225149] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18241.225168] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18246.551449] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18246.551465] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18246.589780] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18246.589798] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18246.628160] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18246.628178] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18246.666541] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18246.666558] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18246.704899] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18246.704915] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18251.556962] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18251.556979] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18251.595486] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18251.595508] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18251.633884] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18251.633902] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18251.672251] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18251.672301] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18251.805591] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18251.805611] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18262.040467] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18262.040489] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18262.078902] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18262.078922] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18262.117288] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18262.117305] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18262.155903] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18262.155923] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18262.194295] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18262.194313] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18267.520435] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18267.520451] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18267.558925] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18267.558945] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18267.597295] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18267.597313] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18267.635707] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18267.635734] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18267.674148] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18267.674168] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18273.000449] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18273.000465] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18273.040050] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18273.040077] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18273.078477] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18273.078497] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18273.116844] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18273.116863] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18273.155476] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18273.155497] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18278.481472] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18278.481489] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18278.519842] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18278.519860] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18278.559625] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18278.559646] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18278.597997] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18278.598018] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18278.636382] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18278.636409] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18283.962662] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18283.962678] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18284.003486] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18284.003505] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18284.044694] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18284.044715] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18284.083094] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18284.083112] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18284.121482] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18284.121499] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18289.447695] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18289.447711] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18289.486044] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18289.486066] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18289.524406] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18289.524425] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18289.562851] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18289.562872] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18289.601218] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18289.601236] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18294.927459] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18294.927475] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18294.965886] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18294.965907] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18295.004254] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18295.004303] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18295.042728] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18295.042750] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18295.081101] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18295.081119] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18300.406460] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18300.406476] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18300.444903] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18300.444924] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18300.483273] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18300.483291] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18300.521661] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18300.521688] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18300.560059] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18300.560079] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18305.886493] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18305.886509] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18305.924859] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18305.924885] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18305.963276] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18305.963297] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18306.001634] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18306.001652] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18306.040188] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18306.040208] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18317.333143] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18317.333163] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18317.371976] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18317.372002] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18317.410848] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18317.410875] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18317.449718] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18317.449745] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18317.488554] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18317.488579] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18322.818088] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18322.818111] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18322.858725] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18322.858753] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18322.897537] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18322.897566] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18322.946747] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18322.946775] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18322.986281] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18322.986308] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18328.330435] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18328.330451] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18328.370275] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18328.370295] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18328.408621] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18328.408639] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18328.446976] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18328.447004] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18328.485380] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18328.485399] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18333.811686] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18333.811701] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18333.852436] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18333.852457] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18333.892297] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18333.892321] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18333.932208] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18333.932229] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18333.972147] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18333.972166] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18339.301600] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18339.301616] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18339.342339] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18339.342360] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18339.382015] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18339.382037] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18339.422063] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18339.422084] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18339.461743] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18339.461761] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18344.790435] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18344.790452] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18344.828843] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18344.828863] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18344.867212] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18344.867229] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18344.905658] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18344.905679] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18344.944020] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18344.944040] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18350.270447] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18350.270464] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18350.308916] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18350.308936] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18350.347287] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18350.347304] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18350.385723] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18350.385750] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18350.424149] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18350.424169] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18355.750447] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18355.750463] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18355.790349] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18355.790370] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18355.828728] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18355.828745] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18355.867077] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18355.867094] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18355.905514] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18355.905534] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18361.232434] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18361.232450] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18361.270768] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18361.270796] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18361.309146] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18361.309166] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18361.347516] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18361.347533] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18361.386096] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18361.386116] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18366.712432] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18366.712448] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18366.750764] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18366.750781] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18366.789146] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18366.789166] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18366.827517] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18366.827534] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18366.865979] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18366.866001] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18372.192473] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18372.192489] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18372.230892] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18372.230910] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18372.269449] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18372.269470] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18372.307814] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18372.307831] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18372.346174] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18372.346196] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18386.331983] ath5k phy0: noise floor calibration timeout (2412MHz)
[18389.026191] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18389.026219] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18389.066580] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18389.066607] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18389.106950] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18389.106977] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18389.147308] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18389.147329] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18389.187146] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18397.330573] ath5k phy0: noise floor calibration timeout (2412MHz)
[18408.330605] ath5k phy0: noise floor calibration timeout (2412MHz)
[18419.330506] ath5k phy0: noise floor calibration timeout (2412MHz)
[18430.330097] ath5k phy0: noise floor calibration timeout (2412MHz)
[18441.330427] ath5k phy0: noise floor calibration timeout (2412MHz)
[18451.579484] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18451.579505] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18451.618841] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18451.618859] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18451.657282] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18451.657303] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18451.697520] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18451.697540] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18451.737374] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18457.064471] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18457.064488] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18457.104748] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18457.104766] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18457.143222] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18457.143238] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18457.185082] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18457.185103] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18457.223549] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18457.223566] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18462.549446] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18462.549463] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18462.588737] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18462.588754] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18462.627245] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18462.627269] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18462.668702] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18462.668723] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18462.707167] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18462.707184] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18468.034513] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18468.034529] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18468.084515] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18468.084542] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18468.123338] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18468.123365] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18468.164058] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18468.164085] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18468.204674] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18468.204700] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18473.533596] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18473.533613] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18473.576505] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18473.576527] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18473.616201] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18473.616218] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18473.656353] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18473.656373] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18473.696288] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18473.696310] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18479.024661] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18479.024677] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18479.065198] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18479.065216] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18479.106372] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18479.106393] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18479.144733] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18479.144750] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18479.183051] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18479.183071] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18484.508606] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18484.508622] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18484.546956] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18484.546974] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18484.585300] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18484.585316] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18484.623657] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18484.623677] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18484.661989] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18484.662007] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18489.988513] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18489.988536] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18490.026944] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18490.026964] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18490.065307] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18490.065323] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18490.103839] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18490.103859] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18490.142186] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18490.142203] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18495.467432] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18495.467448] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18495.505946] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18495.505966] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18495.544307] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18495.544324] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18495.582680] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18495.582697] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)
[18495.621046] ath5k phy0: failed to wakeup the MAC Chip
[18495.621070] ath5k phy0: can't reset hardware (-5)

[   25.859962] wlan0: direct probe to AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx try 1
[   26.059126] wlan0: direct probe to AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx try 2
[   26.060816] wlan0 direct probe responded
[   26.060832] wlan0: authenticate with AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
[   26.091325] wlan0: authenticated
[   26.091341] wlan0: associate with AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
[   26.121362] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[   26.121379] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[   26.123217] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[   26.123232] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[   26.131935] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[   26.131951] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[   26.136450] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[   26.136466] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[   26.146346] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[   26.146362] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[   26.155952] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[   26.155967] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[   26.157282] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[   26.157298] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[   26.291093] wlan0: associate with AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
[   26.491091] wlan0: associate with AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
[   26.495445] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[   26.495460] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[   26.497074] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[   26.497086] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[   26.497769] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[   26.497779] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[   26.500877] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[   26.500892] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[   26.691106] wlan0: association with AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx timed out
[   52.872833] wlan0: authenticate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[   52.874333] wlan0: authenticated
[   52.874348] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[   52.877792] wlan0: RX AssocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=0 aid=4)
[   52.877807] wlan0: associated
[  480.568403] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy try 1
[  480.572678] wlan0: disassociating by local choice (reason=3)
[  480.580309] wlan0: deauthenticating by local choice (reason=3)
[  489.779670] wlan0: authenticate with AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
[  489.785649] wlan0: authenticated
[  489.785669] wlan0: associate with AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
[  489.804481] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[  489.804504] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[  489.806957] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[  489.806980] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[  489.986104] wlan0: associate with AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
[  490.185104] wlan0: associate with AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
[  490.192299] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[  490.192316] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[  490.194517] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[  490.194538] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[  490.194762] wlan0: RX AssocResp from xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx (capab=0x401 status=12 aid=0)
[  490.194783] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[  490.385103] wlan0: association with AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx timed out
[  493.850542] wlan0: authenticate with AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
[  505.938814] wlan0: authenticate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[  505.940432] wlan0: authenticated
[  505.940447] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[  505.942778] wlan0: RX AssocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=0 aid=4)
[  505.942793] wlan0: associated
[  572.092351] wlan0 direct probe responded
[  572.092367] wlan0: authenticate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[  572.094176] wlan0: authenticated
[  572.094194] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[  572.096549] wlan0: RX ReassocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=0 aid=4)
[  572.096564] wlan0: associated
[  576.087054] wlan0: deauthenticated (Reason: 1)
[  577.087114] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy try 1
[  577.089365] wlan0 direct probe responded
[  577.089379] wlan0: authenticate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[  577.091340] wlan0: authenticated
[  577.091358] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[  577.093711] wlan0: RX ReassocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=12 aid=0)
[  577.093731] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[  577.291149] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[  577.293365] wlan0: RX AssocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=0 aid=4)
[  577.293383] wlan0: associated
[  752.083161] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy try 1
[  752.107065] wlan0: deauthenticating by local choice (reason=3)
[  760.181162] wlan0: direct probe to AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx try 1
[  760.181289] wlan0: direct probe to AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx try 1
[  760.381100] wlan0: direct probe to AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx try 2
[  760.581101] wlan0: direct probe to AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx try 3
[  760.781121] wlan0: direct probe to AP xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx timed out
[  762.855171] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy try 1
[  762.857417] wlan0 direct probe responded
[  762.857432] wlan0: authenticate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[  762.859119] wlan0: authenticated
[  762.859136] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[  762.861515] wlan0: RX AssocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=0 aid=4)
[  762.861530] wlan0: associated
[ 8758.755422] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy try 1
[ 8758.955102] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy try 2
[ 8759.155043] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy try 3
[ 8759.355038] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy timed out
[ 8917.385411] wlan0: authenticate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[ 8917.387151] wlan0: authenticated
[ 8917.387165] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[ 8917.389600] wlan0: RX AssocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=0 aid=4)
[ 8917.389615] wlan0: associated
[ 9121.444761] wlan0 direct probe responded
[ 9121.444778] wlan0: authenticate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[ 9121.446753] wlan0: authenticated
[ 9121.446768] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[ 9121.448946] wlan0: RX ReassocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=0 aid=4)
[ 9121.448960] wlan0: associated
[ 9125.438036] wlan0: deauthenticated (Reason: 1)
[ 9126.438127] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy try 1
[ 9126.440324] wlan0 direct probe responded
[ 9126.440339] wlan0: authenticate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[ 9126.442139] wlan0: authenticated
[ 9126.442157] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[ 9126.444505] wlan0: RX ReassocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=12 aid=0)
[ 9126.444521] wlan0: AP denied association (code=12)
[ 9126.642108] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[ 9126.644269] wlan0: RX AssocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=0 aid=4)
[ 9126.644284] wlan0: associated
[12643.999445] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy try 1
[12644.021814] wlan0: deauthenticating by local choice (reason=3)
[12657.128114] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy try 1
[12657.130371] wlan0 direct probe responded
[12657.130387] wlan0: authenticate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[12657.132136] wlan0: authenticated
[12657.132153] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[12657.134521] wlan0: RX AssocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=0 aid=4)
[12657.134536] wlan0: associated
[13215.496914] wlan0: disassociating by local choice (reason=3)
[13263.726131] wlan0: direct probe to AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy try 1
[13263.728978] wlan0 direct probe responded
[13263.728993] wlan0: authenticate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[13263.730608] wlan0: authenticated
[13263.730623] wlan0: associate with AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
[13263.732879] wlan0: RX AssocResp from yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy (capab=0x431 status=0 aid=4)
[13263.732894] wlan0: associated
[18235.355102] wlan0: no probe response from AP yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy - disassociating

x = neighbor’s router’s MAC
y = my router’s MAC

One thing was noticeably different: the wifi LED remained solidly lit both in Linux following reboot and again in Windows following another reboot. Each reboot — both Linux and Windows — resulted with the Atheros card undetected. I was unable this time to get wireless running again after resuming from suspend in Windows, which has worked for me previously. I rebooted into Windows and once again had functional wireless.

This is fucking ridiculous. What really bothers me is that whatever is happening persists across reboots, let alone from Linux to Windows. It’s not just the inconvenience but the concern that something like this could cause harm to the hardware and render it unusable.

Another Way (Maybe) to Skin The MTP Cat

July 19, 2009

I knew there was a nexus between MTP and PTP but I hadn’t checked to see if I could use libgphoto2 to access my Samsung S3 before today. I decided to check because I saw the S3 listed among the devices supported by libgphoto2. Imagine that.

I’d already installed gtkam, which uses libgphoto2, to manage my old Kodak digital camera. I looked to see if the S3 was among the “cameras” listed in the camera selection dialog. It wasn’t listed there but several similar Samsung models were. I didn’t have anything to lose so I plugged it in. I then ran the “detect” option and, voila, I had a listing for my MTP device. I expanded the entry and I had access to everything on the device.

screenshot-20090719160151

What gets me is that this (in #!/Jaunty) is the current version of gtkam and libgphoto2 2.4.2 (current is 2.4.6 and the S3 is named among supported devices in that version). Even with the current version of libmtp, I don’t have the ability to see things by directory (not shown but take my word for it: “Datacasts” and all  the other directories are listed above this “Music” directory) when using apps like rhythmbox. My only option is to use mtp-tools (aka “mtp-examples” to those of you still hitting my blog searching for Fedora help). The only options I have in rhythmbox are to view by artist, song, album, etc. Useful but limited. At least mtp-tools is adequate to manage the device.

I haven’t looked to see if there are any other apps using libgphoto2 to manage MTP devices or to allow mounting them via fuse. Speaking of fuse, the version of mtpfs in Jaunty’s repositories is of no use to me. I can mount the device but a command like ls results with question marks rather than file sizes and permissions. It also shows the filenames but doesn’t allow any other operation on them.

Anyway, it’s nice to see there might be another way to use MTP devices under non-Windows operating systems and that it may actually yield better results. Of course, I’ve only tried to read files and directories and delete files. It may be back to square one if I try to add files.

UPDATE: I installed gphotofs, a fuse system for libgphoto2 which allows PTP/MTP cameras to be mounted as any other filesystem. Yes! I can mount the device and have full access of it. Just deleted a bunch of podcasts from the Datacasts directory.

screenshot-20090719165825

My shell, mksh, carries text beyond the screen (<) so you can’t see the rm command but you can see the result. Finally something freaking works right.

UPDATE 2: Add another 16MB (27MB when various {u} dependencies are removed) of cruft removed. Gone are rhythmbox, libmtp, libusb-dev (needed to recompile libmtp), mtp-tools, mtpfs, etc. It’s redundant to gphoto2/gphotofs and I have much better access to my device now.

UPDATE 3: Using gphotofs is very easy, especially if you’ve used fuse before. You need to be in group plugdev. I chose to create a mount point in my home directory (~/mtp) rather than use a point like /mnt. To mount, first make sure fuse is loaded (lsmod if it was built as a module) and then use the gphotofs command:

gphotofs ~/mtp

Or whatever your mount point is. Once mounted, you can navigate and issue commands as you would any other directory (in a terminal, file manager, whatever you want). When finished, unmount the point:

fusermount -u ~/mtp

Or whatever your mount point is. Give it a moment to umount and then you can remove your device. It’ll work for your camera (if the camera is MTP or PTP) as well.

UPDATE 4: Fuck. If it’s too good to be true, it probably is. I can read from the device and copy and delete from it. Copying to it:

cp: cannot create regular file... Function not implemented

So tomorrow I reinstall libmtp and mtp-tools. Yippee.

Update 20090713 am – Miscellaneous

July 12, 2009

#! JWMRC STILL TO-DO
I didn’t boot back into #! until late last night. I’ll try to edit the jwmrc later. I’ll add screenshots to the previous entry momentarily.

DSL ISN’T DEBIAN-LITE, IT’S NOT A JUMPSTART TO DEBIAN-STABLE!
I still get a ton of hits for DSL-related things. I see in the search engine terms for today that I already have someone looking for how to use DSL to install Debian. Don’t! I can’t believe people still think they can do this but it’s not a jumpstart to a small Debian system. Go read my hard drive install page linked up in the top right-hand corner on my blog (click on the banner to to “home” if you’ve landed here and the links in the right column aren’t visible).

In a nutshell, DSL was based on an old version of Knoppix which was based on a now-deprecated version of Debian. Debian no longer offers any support for that version (which was called Woody). You cannot do a dist-upgrade from DSL to Debian-stable without breaking every freaking thing in the system.

You can still use DSL as it is but it appears development has ended. I haven’t seen if John Andrews has posted a roadmap or even announced what he’s doing development-wise.

If you want a small-ish Debian system, the best idea I’ve seen is Kerry’s which he’s posted in various forums including at DSL, IIRC. I searched and found it at the Ubuntu forums again just now. You can use that with any net-install-able distro like Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, etc. The BSDs require a bit more work but also can be used to create lighter systems. Etc. If your computer can run Slitaz or a POS distro like Puppy, you can run Tiny Core and build a light system, too.

WIFI BS
I’m still a bit anxious about how this Atheros card is performing under Linux. I’d hoped the more recent kernel in #! would resolve the matter. I’d suspended and resumed a few times to see if it would flake out on me, but what happened yesterday was the longest time it had been suspended while running #!.

I’m also noticing that my transfer rate is swinging wildly from 1 mb/s to 54 mb/s. I’m going to have to delve through more bug reports and see wtf is happening. I knew the other stuff I’d experienced with older (and apparently not patched as much as I thought) kernels was a known issue. I haven’t looked to see if any other reports have been filed since the big re-write. I compared my signal using my old ThinkPad which uses a Broadcom card and the wireless signal strength, transfer rate, etc., seems more stable with it.

I also need to double check my warranty. I know it’s supposed to be one year but I don’t remember the fine print to see how nitpicky it is. If it’s voided, I may bust this thing up and find another card.

(Edit: Signal strength and rate isn’t an issue in Windows, only in Linux. I likely won’t change the card unless I decide against upgrading to Windows 7.)

oh no not again

July 12, 2009

Suspended the AA1 while running crunchbang when I left to work out. Got back, checked to resume before taking a shower. Network not connected, which is as it should be when the system suspends. I’d added a script to put more network stats in conky and noticed the SSID was listed as that lone unencrypted AP in my neighborhood and not mine. Again, I kind of expected that because it’s been associating with that AP before trying my hidden SSID even though I don’t think it should (ever) do that.

Waited, waited, waited. Nothing.

Opened terminal. Did a quick iwconfig and iwlist. I then saw that wlan0 couldn’t scan, which is what had been happening with the old kernel under Fedora.

Fuck. Not again.

So I rebooted into #!. No network, same SSID (not mine), etc. Checked iwlist again. No scanning.

(Edit to add screenshot. ImageMagick didn’t capture the space where conky was behind terminator for some reason. That SSID isn’t mine, it’s the one some idiot turned on without changing any default settings or turning on encryption.)

screenshot-20090712123222

Fuck. Not again. How fucking dare it do this.

Back in Windows now after more issues which persisted — again — even after using Linux. That’s right — once again the “problem” persisted a reboot in Linux and after booting into Windows. It’s done that every goddamn time I’ve gone through this shit. The card works fine under Windows in every other circumstance. Zero problems before I ever ran Linux on it, zero while suspending and resuming all fucking day and night long for weeks at a time when not dealing with Linux.

When I first booted into Windows this time, I couldn’t see any SSIDs. I also couldn’t do anything because it locks up while trying to connect to network printers, to check security software updates, etc.

The solution is the same as before and I don’t know why the hell this works under Windows but not under Linux, let alone why the problem continues from one operating system to another. I suspended in Windows, waited for all the stuff to come to a stop, then opened the netbook, resumed. Voila, the beautiful orange-ish wireless LED once again fired immediately upon resume and I’m again able to use this wireless card.

And before anyone suggests I add lines to various files in /etc to restart wireless  when resuming, that didn’t help before. I also don’t see how it could possibly help now, either, considering I couldn’t fucking scan for any SSID by the time I could even open a terminal.

I just wasted another half an hour of my life trying to deal with this bullshit once again.

Maybe that should be my clue to be done with it and use what actually works correctly.

I’ll get around to editing everything I said I would later, if I decide to boot back into #! today. I’ll edit this post to add screenshots if or whenever I do.

Fiddling with emacs and ratmenu

July 12, 2009

I’ve been setting up some things for emacs and my window managers this morning. First, I got all my .emacs files together (the ones currently in use plus the backups I could find) and unified as much as possible. Then I set up weblogger.el on my AA1 (sorry to those whose RSS readers got broken links after I removed my test entries). Think it’s working better now. Either that or I’ll get pwnt soon.

I also worked on ratmenu-ing this morning. There’s really no difference between it and ratmen in terms of execution, but ratmen wasn’t available in the repositories so ratmenu it is. I put together a few menus I can launch from within jwm or ratpoison (which I finally installed while ago). I also made a cheatsheet I can get from the jwm menu to remind me of the ratmenu bindings and the keys for reconfiguring jwm to match the openbox bindings from #!. I need to edit it for the rest I set up and probably add  some of the other cryptic bindings I did.

screenshot-20090712094752

The “audio” menu is my favorite. I’ll explain when I post my jwmrc. I should have time to finish editing the #! jwmrc later today and will post ASAP in case anyone’s interested in one that will allow a (hopefully) seamless transition from openbox to jwm, which is much lighter and has most, if not all, the parts used in the default #! desktop.

Also on my to-do list at some point is hitting the wikis and figuring out how to silence the fucking fan on this thing. I don’t remember it running non-stop in Fedora or PCLOS. I know it doesn’t in Windows.

getting ready for crunchbang de-bloat, etc.

July 11, 2009

I haven’t changed things around much yet beyond what I wrote yesterday. I’ve started looking at what I can remove and what I’ll have to live with. Here’s a list of the things from dry runs I did earlier to see what I can do without causing major breakage:

The following packages will be REMOVED:
 abiword abiword-common abiword-help abiword-plugin-grammar 
 abiword-plugin-mathview gnumeric gnumeric-common gnumeric-doc 
 libgoffice-0-6 libgoffice-0-6-common 
0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 10 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 60.4MB will be freed.

The following packages will be REMOVED:
 agave 
0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 1 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 1012kB will be freed.

The following packages will be REMOVED:
 claws-mail claws-mail-html2-viewer claws-mail-i18n claws-mail-pgpinline 
 claws-mail-pgpmime claws-mail-trayicon tango-icon-theme-claws-mail-3.6.0 
0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 7 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 9720kB will be freed.

The following packages will be REMOVED:
 linux-headers-2.6.28-13 linux-headers-2.6.28-13-generic 
 linux-headers-generic 
0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 3 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 74.7MB will be freed.

The following packages will be REMOVED:
 crunchbang-gwibber-theme gedit-plugins gwibber libmetacity0 metacity 
 metacity-common python-gnome2-desktop 
0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 7 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 16.6MB will be freed.

The following packages will be REMOVED:
 nvidia-173-modaliases nvidia-180-modaliases nvidia-71-modaliases 
 nvidia-96-modaliases nvidia-common 
0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 5 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 459kB will be freed.

The following packages will be REMOVED:
 libpurple-bin libpurple0 pidgin pidgin-data 
0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 4 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 28.9MB will be freed.

The following packages will be REMOVED:
 rhythmbox 
0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 1 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 14.5MB will be freed.

The following packages will be REMOVED:
 vim vim-gtk vim-gui-common vim-runtime xchat 
0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 5 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 30.2MB will be freed.

The following packages will be REMOVED:
 libexo-0.3-0 libthunar-vfs-1-2 libxfce4util4 libxfcegui4-4 libxfconf-0-2 
 thunar-data xfburn xfconf 
0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 8 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 19.5MB will be freed.

I think I counted over 200MB and that’s without counting things like gpodder, which is of no use to me if MTP support is lacking for my S3 (so libmtp and mtp-tools will go), and a few other things in that list. I can also get rid of some of the CD/DVD tools (brasero if it’s not in that list above) since I don’t have any plans to start toting around a USB CD/DVD which will probably outweigh my AA1. My mini CDRW bit the dust when I was taking care of family last year. I haven’t been able to find another device this small and thumbdrives are big enough now that I don’t see any reason to get an external optical device. Even Microsoft is considering putting the Windows 7 installer on a USB drive to make installation easier for netbook users. What’s funny is, Microsoft may beat most of the big Linux distros to the punch — with most distros, live images can be put on USB media via external tools like unetbootin or Fedora’s live USB creator. There are only a handful which have USB-ready images that can be installed via simple scripts. I think that’s the future whether netbooks and nettops ever outsell traditional computers.

100_0660_scaled

Yes, that’s the old CDRW next to my AA1. If anyone knows of a DVD-RW (or Blu-Ray!) this small, please let me know.

By the way, no problems like I had in Fedora yet with wifi even though I’ve tested suspend/resume. The only thing that continues to be an issue is the initial association with the wrong AP before it re-associates with my router. I really, really don’t like that but I haven’t looked to see what I can do to stop it. In addition to the stuff in dmesg, iwconfig shows the association with SSID=”the wrong one” and then after the nm-applet icon changes to show that it’s connected iwconfig shows SSID=”my router.”

I have some other things I have to take care of today and a busy evening, too. It might be tomorrow before I get down to business.

Hiatus

July 6, 2009

Okay, final straw with this problem I’ve had recur several times now with suddenly losing wireless and no longer being able to even scan. I’ve mentioned this problem a couple times before. It starts in Linux and persists even when I reboot into Windows. It hasn’t ever happened to me in Windows alone — not before I installed Linux and not while running Windows. It only happens in Linux (specifically in Fedora).

There must be something dreadfully wrong with the ath5k driver in Linux or in any patches Fedora may apply to it or in NetworkManager. I didn’t look to see if there’s something in dmesg that might be helpful, but I did notice that iwconfig showed throttling at different transfer rates even when I manually set it down to 11MB. Then I’d look again a few minutes later and one time it’s at 1MB and the next it’s at 54MB.

I was running nm-applet and suddenly got a notice that I’d lost my network. Then it tried to reconnect. I was able to scan briefly while it tried to reconnect the first time, but it picked up only my SSID (there are at least six visible now in Windows) and showed a weak (12/100) signal strength (“EXCELLENT” in Windows). Then I got into this circular hell with the Gnome keyring dialog and then another one with my WPA settings. Meanwhile, scanning showed no visible networks anymore. The problem once again persisted when rebooting into Windows. I logged in, the wifi LED blinked a time or two, and then I got the icon in my system tray showing that I didn’t have wireless; it was unable to scan again, too.

This tells me that whatever the fuck is happening, it can’t be very good for my wifi card because a software-only issue should resolve when the system is rebooted. So it seems to be affecting the hardware. Is the card overheating? I don’t know. I mentioned before that the area above the card gets pretty hot when running Linux (I recall similar heat under other distros I’ve run). All I know is that I’m able to get things up and running again after resuming from suspend.

Between this craziness and the card readers issue, it’s getting easier to decide to upgrade to Windows 7 in a few months. I was hoping to be able to find an alternative, but right now I see too many problems to consider Linux a viable solution for me — especially if it turns out the problem is or could be deleterious to my hardware. Maybe this can be fixed somehow between now and October 22nd. Maybe not.

In the interim, my Linux-related posts may be less frequent than they’ve been the past few weeks because I honestly have no idea if or when I’m going to bother booting back into Fedora.

EDIT/UPDATE – 6 July 2009 – 22:05 US/Central: I read through some of the bug reports and need to doa little more homework to see if the Fedora kernel has the appropriate patches. If not, more work for me to do and I may go ahead and install Fedora 11 — or something else — with a newer kernel with the rewritten module and see if that works. If anyone reading this uses the ath driver in any of the BSDs, please leave comment about any issues with it (with or without the patch mentioned on the netbsd wiki’s Aspire One page).

PCLOS Card Readers: My Temporary Workaround

April 16, 2009

Let me preface that my real workaround right now is just using Windows. I’m hardly booting Linux at all, and then it’s only to try to get stuff working right rather than actually using it.

I admittedly have had very little time to work on getting the card readers on my AA1 to work, but the various things I’ve tried have all failed. The end result is most often a complete freeze.

That includes booting with a card inserted in one or even both slots — freeze during boot. I’ve also tried loading the pciehd module from /etc/rc.local and manually. The system freezes if and when there’s a card inserted.

The only way I’ve been able to get pictures from card to computer in Linux on the AA1 is to connect one of my cameras with a USB cable and download them that way. This has worked with digikam in KDE and gtkam elsewhere (ratpoison, jwm). Simple work around but it means I have to have a camera and cable with me to transfer files. Or carry around a USB adapter for the cards. That sucks, though.

digikam-dl

I was going to compile a new kernel to see if I could get things resolved that way but PCLOS 2009.1 comes with a version of gcc (4.1.1?) that the kernel doesn’t want to compile with. Rather than screw around with it any more (just not enough time right now), I’ve thrown up my hands. I’m probably going to try a few more distros while waiting for NetBSD 5.0 and seeing how well it handles this hardware; no idea how soon I’ll do anything else because of work and family commitments.

Til then, Windows XP works beautifully.

Things that work perfectly in XP that are still messed up in Linux: card readers, resume from suspend/hibernate (various issues), switching between screen and VGA-out doesn’t work right, speaker doesn’t mute when earphones are inserted in jack, internal microphone doesn’t work at all, function key controls don’t work correctly, and probably more things that aren’t coming to mind immediately. The deal breakers for me right now are the resume and VGA issues because I need to be able to use my projector for presentations. I’d also like to be able to use my cards without going through another device (camera, phone, audio player) or adapter.

Speaking of audio players, we have a couple devices — purchased because they’re ogg-friendly — that use MTP and I’ve been unable to use them under Linux thus far. No, enabling MTP in amarok didn’t help. Not sure if the problem is specific to the distro or what, but, like I keep saying, right now I don’t have time to delve further into it.

There is No Microsoft Tax Except on Lazy Twats

April 13, 2009

Disclaimer: I openly admit I’m in a very shitty mood today and that it probably contributes to the tone of this rant. So what.

WARNING: Contains bad words. Reader discretion advised (because I’m not using any myself today).

Seems nary a week goes by without hearing some clueless fucktard complain about a “Microsoft tax” — although it’s usually in the more toxic form of “Micro$hit” or “Windoze” or some similarly inane, juvenile bullshit. This supposed, mythical “tax” refers to the cost of a Windows license included in the cost of OEM computers, which, of course, make up the bulk of computers sold.

This, though, is a fallacy. It’s bogus. It’s FUD. It isn’t a tax — not a Microsoft tax, not a Windows tax, not a tax period. Whether the free software crowd likes it or not, the prevalence of such Windows pre-installed computers in stores and online reflects what most consumers want despite the availability of less-costly alternative operating systems like Linux. To those mainstream users, Windows is an essential value-added part of the system. It’s just like the RAM or hard drive or the power supply: it’s not something desirable without it.

Contrary to the unproven claims (more FUD) of the conspiracy nut crowd in the free software movement, Microsoft doesn’t pay the OEMs to include Windows on every computer. It’s the other way around with the OEMs paying Microsoft for bulk licenses, but the idiots who foam at the mouth about Microsoft don’t really care. To them, economies of scale — such as when someone gets a bulk discount compared to someone who buys smaller amounts pays more per unit — are evil when one software company does it; I wonder how many of them shop at discount places where they get lower rates because either they or the discount places have similar deals for various and sundry goods. Buying in bulk is good if you do it at your local hippie food co-op but not when buying software? I smell some hypocrisy!

Contrary to other assertions from the anti-Microsoft crowd, it’s a win-win-win situation. Microsoft makes less money per unit in the  bulk deals but they still come out fine because they guarantee themselves a revenue stream from bulk sales. Computer buyers win because they get affordable computers that work the way they expect. The bulk deals also benefit the OEMs because the people buying their computers expect an operating system and they expect it to look and work like Windows: these computers wouldn’t sell as well without an operating system, or even with Linux.

This last point is further established when comparing netbook sales. Linux had a tremendous head start but Windows now outsells Linux on netbooks at the same rate it does on desktops. Windows 7 will be the death blow of netbook Linux (and probably desktop Linux, too, though it’s hard to call it “alive” with its paltry marketshare). Linux netbook return rates — from disappointed users who expected a user experience more like Windows — have far outpaced returns of Windows units. Why are people so much more willing to pay an extra $50-100 for Windows-based netbooks if price is the primary criterion for their popularity?

Because it represents significant value to them, not a tax.

The whiners who bitch about this faux “tax” do so on the grounds that less expensive standard run assembly-line OEM boxes come preconfigured with Windows rather than Linux. They do have plenty of alternatives if they don’t want Windows. It’s not difficult to assemble a system by oneself: if anything, that gives the user absolute control over what parts go in and whether they’re supported in whatever operating system the user has in mind for it. There are also many builders of custom computers in most communities (well, in the developed world but also in some under-developed parts of the world as well) and online. These custom computers can be very affordable for the more miserly user or they can be built to kill — the sky’s the limit. Some OEMs, like Dell, sell Linux-based laptops and desktops in addition to Linux-based netbooks. Some OEMs will also sell custom-spec’d machines sans operating systems.

The actual cost savings, though, varies tremendously because of factors like the actual cash value of a bulk OEM license. Users aren’t necessarily going to get retail value off or refunded because the OEMs don’t charge users retail value for Windows: the computers would cost a lot more if they did (oh, evil Microsoft and their bulk license agreements — how dare they save average computer users money like that!). Also, the cost of an OEM computer sans operating system often qualifies as a “special run” or custom which comes with an extra charge even if the hardware is otherwise from a standard line. That’s the price of going against the tide.

Is that a price the true-believers are willing to pay? Or do they need a whipping boy to rail about — not to mention a straw man of a “tax” to tear down while preaching to their choir?

I think the only group for whom it really is a tax is those babbling bunches of pro-Linux cunts who are either too lazy or stupid to find computers sold without Windows and prefer to whine about some “Windoze tax” that wouldn’t even exist without them because most users want and get value out of pre-installed Windows. Remember that next time you see the word tax put anywhere next to Microsoft or any of its products.